A FOOD AND HOME LIFE BLOG

A FOOD AND HOME LIFE BLOG

Jjambbong

Jjambbong

If you remember a while ago, I posted a recipe for jjajangmyun. As delicious and hearty jjajangmyun is, it’s missing a few things for those who love spice and soup.

Meet jjajangmyun’s frenemy: JJAMBBONG.

While the former is nice and sweet, the latter is mean and spicy

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It’s hot. It’s soupy. It can hit you in the eye if you slurp too fast. It makes you sweat. It makes your nose runny.

But, it is SO WORTH IT.

Jjambbong is a spicy noodle soup with veggies and most importantly, seafood. TONS of seafood.

Shrimp, mussels and squid are the usual suspects, but invite your favorite to the party.

The broth is made from an anchovy and kelp stock that isn’t fishy at all. It’s actually quite nice and what gives the soup its nice, deep umami flavor.

Jjambbong is traditionally red and looks like fire lava soup. Mine’s just a little bit different.

When I was developing this recipe, I debated on adding korean red chili pepper flakes, which is what makes the soup so red, and I decided not to. The resulting soup isn’t red; It’s more of a clearish broth with streaks of orange. Don’t let that fool you.

You’ll tuck in, thinking, pfftt. This won’t be hot. But then your eyes’ll stream and your ears’ll pop because it’s deceptively spicy.

The secret? Sesame Chili Oil. I knew I wanted the heat, but I didn’t want the graininess that red pepper flakes can often give. The sesame chili oil was the answer. The sesame taste is barely there, so it won’t overpower any of the delicate seafood, but lends a smooth spiciness to your jjambbong. If you like your jjambbong to be the traditional red, just add a couple spoonfuls of red chili flakes when you sauté the veggies.

With the weather getting colder, you’ll want more soup in your life. When that craving hits, make this soup. It’ll hit the spot.

Let’s make it!

 

Jjambbong

  • Servings: 3-4
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Prep Time: ~10M | Cook Time: ~30M | Total Time: ~40M

Recipe Author: SavorySeoul


INGREDIENTS

STOCK

  • 7 cups water
  • 4 dried anchovies
  • 2 one inch squares dashima (dried kelp)

EVERYTHING ELSE

  • noodles (cooked to package directions)
  • 1 large onion sliced
  • 6-7 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 inch ginger minced
  • 1/4 head cabbage sliced (nappa or green)
  • seafood (as much as you would like to add)
    • I used a seafood mix that had clams, mussels and squid that I bought at a korean grocery store
    • I also added shrimp and some more mussels
  • sesame chili oil
  • salt and pepper

DIRECTIONS

  1. First, add all the stock ingredients into a pot and bring to a boil. Once boiling, let it simmer for 10 minutes then turn off the heat.
  2. In a large pot, add 2-3 tablespoons of the chili oil and cook the garlic and ginger until fragrant.
  3. Add the onions and cabbage and cook, stirring occasionally for 2-3 minutes.
  4. Add the seafood and cook for a minute.
  5. Pour the hot stock and bring to a boil. Taste for seasoning and add more salt, pepper and chili oil to your liking.
  6. Serve over the cooked noodles and eat immediately.

SERVE & ENJOY!




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